A Return to the Stone Age – Montana’s Latest Floodplain Ordinance

If you care about the protection and restoration of Montana’s streams and rivers, it’s time to let your voice be heard.  The Montana Department of Natural Resources (DNRC) has formally implemented a plan to require the use of large, non-native rip rap and/or concrete structures for all stream restoration and…

>Read More

Share Button

Green and Soft: New Materials for River Restoration

Many terms have been used to describe the engineering use of plant materials for slope stabilization – soil bioengineering, biotechnical stabilization, biostabilization, green engineering, biotechnical erosion control – but the underlying concept for all terms is the use of plants (sometimes in combination with other reinforcement materials) to reduce the…

>Read More

Share Button

Yellowstone Levees, Rip-Rap to Face More Scrutiny Under New Plan

As practitioners and advocates for soft, green approaches to stream and river restoration, THI applauds a recent plan released by the Army Corps of Engineers which will further restrict levees and rip-rap along the upper Yellowstone River. Covering a 48-mile stretch of the Yellowstone between Emigrant and the river’s confluence…

>Read More

Share Button

“Engineering With Nature” Fema Case Studies Show Greener Alternatives To Riprap

 There are numerous options for approach when it comes to the complex issues of riverbank stabilization.  FEMA’s “Engineering with Nature- Alternative Techniques to Riprap Bank Stabilization”  highlights several basic alternative measures that have successfully been used.   The case studies demonstrate the use of erosion control blankets, woody plantings, LWD and…

>Read More

Share Button