Urban Stormwater Poisons Salmon – Fix is at Hand

A recent study reported in the Journal of Applied Ecology notes that stormwater runoff from urban roadways is extremely toxic for coho salmon, and can kill adult fish in just two and a half hours. Scientists have been quick to point out that a fix is simple.  Julann Spromberg, a…

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NWF Offers 10 Important Tips for Working with Nature to Keep Us Safe

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) ran a great article by Joshua Saks identifying “Five Actions to Protect People, Property and Wildlife from Storm and Flood Damages” http://blog.nwf.org/2012/11/post-sandy-working-with-nature-to-keep-us-safe/ and “Five Actions that Put People, Property and Wildlife at Risk from Storm and Flood Damages.” http://blog.nwf.org/2012/11/post-sandy-working-with-nature-to-keep-us-safe/…

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Flood Risk and the Critical Importance of Healthy Floodplains

The Connecticut River Watershed Council and the Conservation Law Foundation have joined together to look at why Otter Creek in Rutland leapt up as Irene Struck, increasing in flow by nearly 20 times in the space of a little more than a day, while downstream in Middlebury the river rose…

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Dead Zones Will Be the Largest in History This Year

With heavier than normal snow and rain events this year it’s not surprising that the Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay would be the end recipents of extra runoff.  Ironically, a couple of centuries ago the extra influx of natural nutrients would have been a boon for these productive estuaries.…

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Restoration Notes from the Field – The “Silver Bullet”

Habitat loss and fragmentation are the greatest threats to species biodiversity. In our nation’s more arid environments, the vast bulk of all biodiversity is found in the increasingly fragile riparian buffers of our watersheds.  Healthy floodplains and other ecosystem functions rely directly on vital intact buffers.  For these important reasons, conservation and…

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Elementary School Students Learn Importance of Trees to our Waterways

Yankee Engineer reports that for the past eight years, Gary Pelton, Biologist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at the Upper Connecticut River Basin Office, has been recruiting elementary schools to help plant trees along the Black River near North Springfield Lake (Perkinsville, Vermont). In May 2010, 265 4th…

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