Tag Archives: conservation

Circle of Blue Reports: Water Prices Up 33 Percent Since 2010

Brett Walton posts that water scarcity has driven prices upward 33 percent since 2010 and that the price of water rose again in 2014 about six percent on average according to a survey of water rates in some 30 major U.S. cities.  Water providers, he notes, are changing the structure of rate schedules, altering both monthly fees and volume fees in order to enable utilities to deal with dropping revenues resulting from water conservation.  In some cases explicit policies promoting water conservation have meant that less water sold is less money paid to utilities.  >Read More via http://www.circleofblue.org/waternews/2014/world/price-water-2014-6-percent-30-major-u-s-cities-33-percent-rise-since-2010/

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Land-Restoration Expert: ‘Nature Never Forgets or Forgives’

A recent Cornell University lecturer, Luc Gnacadja warns that the worldwide problem of soil erosion is contributing to poverty and hunger, threatening both food security and freedom.  Gnacadja recalled President Franklin Roosevelt’s admonition that ‘a nation that destroys its soil, destroys itself’ in his recent April lecture at Cornell.  Careless planting and other practices, he said, continue to cause severe land degradation in many parts of the world and he cautioned that in certain areas, agricultural practices are causing soil to erode almost 100 times faster than the rate at which soil can naturally regenerate.  >Read More via http://phys.org/news/2014-04-land-restoration-expert-cautions-nature.html

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Secretary Jewell on “Deconflicting” our Economy AND Ecology

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Water: Lifeblood of Energy from Prairie Public Broadcasting

The half-hour documentary “Water: The Lifeblood of Energy” from Prairie Public Broadcasting describes the connection between water and energy and how cities and utilities across the western United States are using combinations of collaboration, conservation, and new technology to squeeze more use out of every precious drop.

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Conservation Leaders for the Next Generation

Levi Novey, writing in the Huffington Post blog points up the importance of getting young people “excited about the amazing world we live in, and helping them learn how they can play their own role in protecting it.”  For Novey, who is playing a key role at The Corps Network in helping to build a modern Civilian Conservation Corps  (what U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Sally Jewell has called “CCC2.0″), this important work is about engaging the next generation of conservation stewards and community leaders.  His recent post “Cultivating the Next Generation of Conservation Leaders” applauds those who recently received the White House “Champions for Change” honors and calls on us to lend our hands to this important work.  >Read More

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Kids in the Outdoors – Our Future Depends on It

A program intended to insure that American Children have the opportunity to experience the great outdoors, builds on a Forest Service tradition of conservation and education.   “The challenges associated with climate change and water will not be resolved in a few years. It will take generations. Kids must understand why forests are so valuable so they will grow into citizens who support conservation,” according to USFS.

Educators, parents—and resource managers—are increasingly concerned with the growing disconnect between children and nature, and the kind of future we are creating for our children.  The Forest Service has a tremendous number of ongoing activities to help connect children with nature.  >Learn More via http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/conservationeducation/about/?cid=fsmrs_100571

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Public-Private Partnership to Certify Youth Corps

Restored Creek/Wetland ComplexThe Bay Journal writes: “Beyond political will or ecological know-how, restoring the Chesapeake Bay and other impaired waters across the country requires a good deal of manpower.”  It will take ‘waders in the water,’ to physically return rivers, streams and wetlands to a more natural state.”

“It’s work that Trout Headwaters, Inc., a private water restoration company, has been doing nationwide for nearly 20 years — and work that the company, through a new partnership with The Corps Network, now plans to equip youth corps nationwide to do,” writes the Journal.  >Read More via http://www.bayjournal.com/article/public_private_partnership_to_certify_youth_corps_for_restoration_work

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Unintended Consequences May Have Created a “Point of No Return” for Commercial Fisheries

Graphic courtesy of Conservation Magazine.

Graphic courtesy of Conservation Magazine.

In Conservation Magazine’s recent good read, “Point of No Return: Why Aren’t Fish Populations Recovering?” author Natasha Loder examines why fishery management policies may have resulted in an insurmountable “Darwinian Debt.”

In the 1940s, cod in the northeast Arctic had an average size of 95 cm. Today they average only 65 cm. And average size and age of fish at maturation have been decreasing for decades in many commercially exploited fish stocks. Size limits may be the culprit.

A controlled, peer-reviewed study published in the journal Science in 2002, turned conventional thinking about fisheries management on its head.
“In most commercial fisheries, fish are removed on the basis of size. There are minimum, not maximum, size limits. But the study’s results show that this approach may have results that are exactly the opposite of what is intended. Within only four generations, taking out larger fish produced a smaller and less fertile population that also converted food into flesh less efficiently,” writes Loder.

Read more: http://conservationmagazine.org/2008/07/point-of-no-return/?utm_source=Conservation+Magazine&utm_campaign=7582ac4c87-This_Week_s_Good_Read_Nov+30_2013_10_19_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_d0cc46f2ab-7582ac4c87-294168197

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Calculate Your Water Footprint

Water FootprintThe Water Footprint Assessment Tool provides clear insight into how water is appropriated for human uses and the impacts resulting from those uses. It offers an easy way to calculate and map the water footprint, assess its sustainability and identify strategic actions to improve the sustainability, efficiency and equitability of water use.  If you live in the United States and you are a meat eater, you probably have a high water footprint.

Use the calculator and find out!
Read more:  http://www.waterfootprint.org/?page=cal/WaterFootprintCalculator

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At TEDxCharlottesville: Ushering in the Age of Natural Capitalism

“There are two great joys in life: the tilling of the land, and the cultivation of character. One anchors us and one elevates us,” said conservation capitalist Chandler Van Voorhis late last year at TEDxCharlottesville.

Chandler Van Voorhis is Co-Founder and Managing Partner of GreenTrees, which plants, grows, and sells permanent forests. He is working to make sure people see what he sees: carbon, water, habitat, air filtration, and soil building mulch – all of the valuable ecological services a tree provides while it is a living part of the ecosystem.

Quipping that his family calls him “The Lorax with a Calculator,” Van Voorhis discusses the evolution of conservation in America from the notion of using our resources wisely, to conservation as a national duty, and now, to an ecosystem marketplace where we attach price and value to nature’s assets.

 

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