Tag Archive 'damage'

Carl Zimmer writes recently in the New York Times that levees are not the only things that protect coasts from storm damage.  “Nature offers protection, too” he says.  “Coastal marshes absorb wind energy and waves of storms, weakening their impact farther inland.”  These coastal ecosystems and their services provide significant value he notes, shielding us […]

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Following major floods in January 2014 Marina Pacheco, the chief executive of the UK Mammal Society, recommended that the UK Government promote beaver reintroductions as a means of reducing flood risk in the future. “Restoring the beaver to Britain’s rivers would bring huge benefits in terms of flood alleviation. These unpaid river engineers would quickly […]

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A recent New York Times Opinion piece by Yvon Chouinard titled “Tear Down ‘Deadbeat’ Dams,” rightly questions the values and highlights the environmental risks associated with dams, underlining that the benefits “for water use, flood control and electricity – can now be met more effectively without continuing to choke entire watersheds.” He goes on to […]

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Just beneath the surface of the river restoration industry is an undercurrent of controversy strong enough to create two distinctly-opposed camps. Dubbed the “Rosgen Wars ” during the mid-1990s, this 20-year battle of ideas was named for its protagonist, Colorado hydrologist Dave Rosgen, and pits Rosgen and his legion of followers against some of the […]

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This week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released the results of a comprehensive survey looking at the health of thousands of stream and river miles across the country, finding that 55 percent are classified as poor, and another 23 percent in fair condition for aquatic life. In certain regions, like the Coastal Plains and Temperate […]

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For a stream scientist Tropical Storm Irene, which dumped loads of rain on Northeast, provided what one researcher calls a “grand experiment” — the opportunity to investigate what happens when a stream system faces a major disturbance. In Vermont, where Dartmouth College scientists are studying the aftermath, the storm knocked out hundreds of roads and […]

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In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) ran a great article by Joshua Saks identifying “Five Actions to Protect People, Property and Wildlife from Storm and Flood Damages” http://blog.nwf.org/2012/11/post-sandy-working-with-nature-to-keep-us-safe/ and “Five Actions that Put People, Property and Wildlife at Risk from Storm and Flood Damages.” http://blog.nwf.org/2012/11/post-sandy-working-with-nature-to-keep-us-safe/ In the top five of […]

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The non-profit advocacy group American Rivers is naming the Potomac the nation’s most endangered river, saying it is threatened by nutrient and sediment pollution that lowers the quality of drinking water and kills marine life. The group’s annual report titled, “America’s Most Endangered Rivers,” notes what local friends of the Potomac have said for years: […]

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Overgrazing of riparian areas by livestock is one of the most common impacts THI sees when conducting stream assessments on rural lands. Depending upon the length and severity of improper livestock access, overgrazing in riparian areas cause a decrease in woody vegetation, an increase in streambank erosion and noxious weed colonization , and an overall […]

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Impervious surfaces.  These are two words that most folks in their lifetime will never utter together, unless, of course, you happen to live in an urban flood plain.  A little over 160 homeowners who live adjacent to Cameron Run in Fairfax, Virginia have become quite familiar with the concepts of imperviousness, and what it means […]

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