Tag Archive 'ecology'

From the Field Today – Red Eft

This eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) is  common to eastern North America.  This land dwelling bright orange juvenile, known as a red eft, paid a visit to a Trout Headwaters technician during recent site work in North Carolina.  The newts frequent small lakes, ponds, and streams or near-by wet forests. They can coexist in an aquatic environment with small, noncarnivorous fish, as their skin […]

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It was my pleasure recently to spend the afternoon with Doug La Follette, Secretary of State in Wisconsin for a tour of some of his work and achievement.  He holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Columbia, has worked as Public Affairs Director for the Union of Concerned Scientists, and has been board member of Friends […]

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In Conservation Magazine’s recent good read, “Point of No Return: Why Aren’t Fish Populations Recovering?” author Natasha Loder examines why fishery management policies may have resulted in an insurmountable “Darwinian Debt.” In the 1940s, cod in the northeast Arctic had an average size of 95 cm. Today they average only 65 cm. And average size […]

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“There are two great joys in life: the tilling of the land, and the cultivation of character. One anchors us and one elevates us,” said conservation capitalist Chandler Van Voorhis late last year at TEDxCharlottesville. Chandler Van Voorhis is Co-Founder and Managing Partner of GreenTrees, which plants, grows, and sells permanent forests. He is working to […]

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Wetlands in the U.S. are still taking a hit, and human activity, urban, suburban, and rural development, is the cause. A new study released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) says between 2004 and 2009, wetland area in the coastal watersheds of the U.S. declined by an estimated 360,720 acres. The worst part: […]

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Restoration of wetland ecosystems has typically focused on hydrology, soil, and vegetation, but mammals are drawn to restored wetlands at even higher levels than expected. A study led by Princeton researcher David J. Kurz, and published recently in The American Midland Naturalist, showed that a strategy of “if you build it they will come” is […]

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The Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS), in a position paper on the organization’s website, formally supports wetland mitigation banking to improve mitigation success and contribute to the goal of no net loss of wetlands. For more than a century, the U.S. has been losing wetlands at an alarming rate. When wetlands are impacted by development, […]

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“Tiny sea creatures that play a big role in the ocean food chain are unable to adapt to warming oceans, according to a new study that may have profound ramifications for fisheries,” this according to a recent NBC news report about an Australian study. Does this point to a similar problem for cold, freshwater fisheries, […]

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The EcoBlu Analyst  is a new tool developed by Trout Headwaters, Inc. that provides project managers, investors, non-profits and government with the power of big data in a secure, low-cost and customizable interface.  First deployed for use by the National Mitigation Banking Association NMBA Mitigation Analyst Announcement, the product easily transforms hundreds of thousands of lines of raw data into useable information.  […]

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Just as Johnny Appleseed (John Chapman) made practical and lasting contributions to apple production in the U.S., our firm strives to make practical and lasting contributions to stream and river restoration, often through plantings of willow and other native riparian species. In 1995, Trout Headwaters, Inc (THI) was founded to provide service to private, non-profit, […]

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