20th Anniversary Edition of Trout Headwaters RECENT WORK Released

RECENT WORK | By Trout Headwaters, Inc. | Blurb Trout Headwaters has recently released an anniversary edition of its Recent Work, featuring stream, wetland and habitat restoration projects across the United States.  Hundreds of photos, as well as quotes on nature and the environment are assembled in this concise volume…

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River, Stream and Wetland Restoration – Trout Headwaters Video

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Ecological Restoration –  Now $25 Billion in U.S.

Exciting peer-reviewed research findings just published by PLOS ONE “Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy” by BenDor et al., provide a solid view inside the sector and dispel the notion promoted by some that environmental programs stymie business.  Presently larger than the Coal Industry or Logging…

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Assessment and Monitoring – The Keys to Successful Restoration

A baseline assessment can best be described as the basis by which to judge the success of any action taken to conserve, protect, enhance or restore water resources or habitats. Monitoring, when properly executed, continues to evaluate the health of the resource after any action is taken in order to…

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From the Field Today – Red Eft

This eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) is  common to eastern North America.  This land dwelling bright orange juvenile, known as a red eft, paid a visit to a Trout Headwaters technician during recent site work in North Carolina.  The newts frequent small lakes, ponds, and streams or near-by wet forests. They can coexist in an aquatic environment with small,…

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A Strategy for Saving Planet Earth – Doug La Follette

It was my pleasure recently to spend the afternoon with Doug La Follette, Secretary of State in Wisconsin for a tour of some of his work and achievement.  He holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Columbia, has worked as Public Affairs Director for the Union of Concerned Scientists, and has…

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Unintended Consequences May Have Created a “Point of No Return” for Commercial Fisheries

In Conservation Magazine’s recent good read, “Point of No Return: Why Aren’t Fish Populations Recovering?” author Natasha Loder examines why fishery management policies may have resulted in an insurmountable “Darwinian Debt.” In the 1940s, cod in the northeast Arctic had an average size of 95 cm. Today they average only…

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At TEDxCharlottesville: Ushering in the Age of Natural Capitalism

“There are two great joys in life: the tilling of the land, and the cultivation of character. One anchors us and one elevates us,” said conservation capitalist Chandler Van Voorhis late last year at TEDxCharlottesville. Chandler Van Voorhis is Co-Founder and Managing Partner of GreenTrees, which plants, grows, and sells permanent…

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Coastal Wetlands Continue to Be Gobbled Up by Development

Wetlands in the U.S. are still taking a hit, and human activity, urban, suburban, and rural development, is the cause. A new study released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) says between 2004 and 2009, wetland area in the coastal watersheds of the U.S. declined by an estimated…

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Study Says Mammals Respond to “Field of Dreams” Strategy for Restored Wetlands

Restoration of wetland ecosystems has typically focused on hydrology, soil, and vegetation, but mammals are drawn to restored wetlands at even higher levels than expected. A study led by Princeton researcher David J. Kurz, and published recently in The American Midland Naturalist, showed that a strategy of “if you build…

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