Tag Archive 'floodplain'

Just a few months ago, Boulder, Colorado was in the grip of yet another drought, reports TIME magazine online, and the state also experienced its worst wildfire on record earlier this year. But after days of heavy rainfall that the National Weather Service called “biblical,” drought and fire are the last things that Boulder and […]

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Anywhere it rains, it can flood. Many conditions can result in a flood: hurricanes , overtopped levees, outdated or clogged drainage systems and rapid accumulation of rainfall. Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future. Flood risk isn’t just based on history, it’s also based on […]

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All streams and rivers are subject to flooding.  In mountainous areas, it’s typically annual spring flooding.  But other regions experience heavy rain events at other times of the year that can very quickly turn a peaceful stream into a raging torrent.  At THI we often help prospective landowners determine if buildings are in jeopardy, or […]

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It’s impossible to know where you are going without understanding where you stand right now. Unfortunately, in the relatively new industry of stream, river and wetland restoration, there are individuals and companies making recommendations, and even performing work, without properly evaluating the current condition of the resource. Baseline assessment can best be described as the […]

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Healthy floodplains are nature’s buffer against weather extremes. The San Francisco Chronicle reports on an innovative project  in the San Joaquin Valley  combining  flood management with ecosystem restoration.  The plan includes the purchase of an existing ranch by a nonprofit group called River Partners. The $10 million project is expected to take 10 years to […]

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The cleanup of the Bronx River helped blunt the impact of Hurricane Sandy write JOSÉ SERRANO AND JOHN F. CALVELLI in Crain’s (http://www.crainsnewyork.com) The tristate area is only beginning to recover from the destruction wrought by Hurricane Sandy.  As we assess the damage and how we prepare for a future storm, it is worth noting […]

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For a stream scientist Tropical Storm Irene, which dumped loads of rain on Northeast, provided what one researcher calls a “grand experiment” — the opportunity to investigate what happens when a stream system faces a major disturbance. In Vermont, where Dartmouth College scientists are studying the aftermath, the storm knocked out hundreds of roads and […]

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Clark explored the Yellowstone River in a boat made of lashed cottonwood trees. These trees, which grow along many plains rivers, proved invaluable throughout the journey, providing shade and shelter as well as transportation. To commemorate the tree, Clark named the site where he constructed the boats Camp Cottonwood. But the massive groves have been […]

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Assessing Your Flood Risk

With unpredictable weather patterns becoming the new normal, it may be time to take a fresh look at the flood risk for your home or business.   At THI we often work with clients who have concerns about potential flood risks.  Streams, rivers and wetlands do flood, and it’s much more cost-effective to take time to […]

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Engineering Cannot Save Our Rivers

We note the draft language in Montana DNRC’s 2012 Model Floodplain Ordinance requiring that “a licensed professional engineer” (P.E.) design all stream restoration and bank stabilization projects undertaken in Montana.  While engineering is an important professional discipline, the proposed rule as written would greatly diminish the vital roles played by hydrologists, fluvial geomorphologists, sedimentologists, ecologists, […]

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