Climate Change Urgency… For the Last 20 Years

The Nov. 30, 2015 New York Times headline “Citing Urgency, World Leaders Converge on France for Climate Talks” topped an article that said “One of the largest gatherings of world leaders in history began a multinational effort Monday toward forging what many called the planet’s last, best hope to stave…

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Study: Focus on Smaller Streams Can Save Big River Fish

Large-river fish like paddlefish and blue catfish are in danger.  A University of Wisconsin-Madison study in journal Frontiers in Ecology and Environment says 60 out of 68 species, or 88 percent, of fish species found exclusively in large-river ecosystems like the Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio rivers, are a conservation concern.…

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Will Change Come Fast Enough for Mississippi River Floodplain Policy?

This spring a 45-foot swing in water levels took the Mississippi River from near-dry in places, to near-historic crests in just a few months.  Two years ago, floodplain managers were advocating for policy change on the Mississippi River. But that change is slow. “We need some retreat from our rivers,”…

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Drought Still Threatens Mississippi River

Discovery News recently reported that due to drought conditions, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers warned that the Mississippi River could become unnavigable by mid January. However, efforts by the USACE to blast away rocks have bought more time for barge shipping, according to a press release from the American…

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Flood Risk and the Critical Importance of Healthy Floodplains

The Connecticut River Watershed Council and the Conservation Law Foundation have joined together to look at why Otter Creek in Rutland leapt up as Irene Struck, increasing in flow by nearly 20 times in the space of a little more than a day, while downstream in Middlebury the river rose…

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Only 9 Percent of Mississippi River Levees Rated ‘Acceptable’ by the Corps of Engineers

Another good reason for protecting the health of natural flood plains is the high cost of flooding. The New York Times reports that when the Army Corps of Engineers declared last year that the levees in certain places, like East St. Louis, Ill. were ‘unacceptable,’ the rating kicked up a…

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