Tag Archive 'sediment'

A recent set of four related articles published in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface takes a new approach to understanding sediment transport, a vital component to the ecological health and long-term evolution of river channels. When you look at a river’s water surface, it is rarely smooth. Instead, you can usually see the continual […]

Read Full Post »

The Washington Post reported today on the potential environmental threats to the Chesapeake Bay posed by Hurricane Sandy. “More than a hundred million tons of dirty sediment mixed with tree limbs and junk float behind the Conowingo Dam, and Hurricane Sandy, a giant faucet nicknamed “Frankenstorm,” could send it pouring into the Chesapeake Bay,” says […]

Read Full Post »

The non-profit advocacy group American Rivers is naming the Potomac the nation’s most endangered river, saying it is threatened by nutrient and sediment pollution that lowers the quality of drinking water and kills marine life. The group’s annual report titled, “America’s Most Endangered Rivers,” notes what local friends of the Potomac have said for years: […]

Read Full Post »

Stream and River Restoration  Is Critical to Reducing the Impacts of Storm Events on the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Runoff from the rainfall caused by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee set off a deluge of sediment, trash and toxic sewer wastes in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.  The satellite image below, captured by the […]

Read Full Post »

Doug Pickford of Trout Headwaters, Inc. (THI), an environmental planner with 20 years of experience in the Chesapeake Bay area, will follow events in the bay watershed as the tide turns from voluntary to mandatory for bay cleanup regulations and protections.   Doug’s blog series for THI will document what is likely the largest and most […]

Read Full Post »

I sit watching the brown slug of Argentina’s broad Rio de la Plata flow to the Atlantic Ocean.  Sediment roiled runoff a mile wide originating in farm fields and city streets, draining from gravel roads and cattle feedlots – all emptying into the estuary.  I studied this same phenomena in my own hemisphere during the past […]

Read Full Post »