When it Comes to Restoring Rivers – Sometimes it’s Better to Swim Upstream

Piles of rock or concrete dumped along a stream bank does not equal restoration. In fact, we believe it can often do more harm than good. Trout Headwaters, Inc takes a “do-no-harm” approach to restoration. We’ve pioneered the reliable use of “soft” materials, like natural fiber mats anchored with live native…

>Read More

Share Button

Coastal Erosion – Reversing the Loss

Coastal erosion is a global issue, causing an estimated $500 million per year in property loss and damage.  Shoreline hardening, including rock jetties, groins and seawalls have unfortunately exacerbated this situation by deflecting and increasing wave energy directed at unprotected shores.  Increasingly agencies,  municipalities, and even engineering firms have begun…

>Read More

Share Button

Head for the Hills! Will Climate Change Put You Underwater?

Climate scientists predict that sea levels will rise by three feet — and could rise by as much as five feet — by the year 2100. What does this mean for some of the world’s coastal cities, or your favorite beach?  The map below allows you to explore the regions…

>Read More

Share Button

A Return to the Stone Age – Montana’s Latest Floodplain Ordinance

If you care about the protection and restoration of Montana’s streams and rivers, it’s time to let your voice be heard.  The Montana Department of Natural Resources (DNRC) has formally implemented a plan to require the use of large, non-native rip rap and/or concrete structures for all stream restoration and…

>Read More

Share Button

For Builders, Architects, and Homeowners – Building Near a River or Stream?

A stream or river is constantly adjusting itself. This is nature’s balancing act between the amount of water and gradient in the channel, and the amount and size of the sediment within the system. Any disturbance, either natural or human-caused, will change this balance. Activities such as building within the…

>Read More

Share Button

Restoring Nature’s Water Filter: How Streamside Vegetation Can Save the Gulf of Mexico

(Reprinted from the Environmental News Network): Back in 2003’s Global Environment Outlook Year Book, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) declared the ocean’s “dead zones” the world’s top emerging environmental challenge. Now a recent report by UNEP says the number of dead zones, or low oxygenated areas in the world’s…

>Read More

Share Button

Streamside Vegetation – Water Quality (and Quantity) Benefits Naturally

Riparian areas filter nutrients and improve water quality.  In agricultural-use watersheds, nutrient filtering in riparian zones can help control agricultural nonpoint-source pollution.  Sediment deposition is a natural process that takes place during periodic flooding.  Accelerated upland erosion can increase sediment deposition in riparian and wetland areas because of downslope movement…

>Read More

Share Button